Hypnotherapy

 

www.tri-therapies.com

 

0740 388 9698

empathise@btinternet.com

 

Life is to be enjoyed ... not endured!

 

 

Hypnotherapy

 

Contrary to popular belief, hypnosis is not a state of deep sleep. It does involve the induction of a trance-like condition, but when in it, the client is actually in an enhanced state of awareness, concentrating entirely on the hypnotist's voice. In this state, the conscious mind is suppressed and the subconscious mind is revealed.

 

The therapist is able to suggest ideas, concepts and lifestyle adaptations to the patient, the seeds of which become firmly planted.

 

As such, hypnotherapy is a kind of psychotherapy. Hypnotherapy aims to re-programme patterns of behaviour within the mind, enabling irrational fears, phobias, negative thoughts and suppressed emotions to be overcome. As the body is released from conscious control during the relaxed trance-like state of hypnosis, breathing becomes slower and deeper, the pulse rate drops and the metabolic rate falls. Similar changes along nervous pathways and hormonal channels enable the sensation of pain to become less acute, and the awareness of unpleasant symptoms, such as nausea or indigestion, to be alleviated.

 

How does it work?

Hypnosis is thought to work by altering our state of consciousness in such a way that the analytical left-hand side of the brain is turned off, while the non-analytical right-hand side is made more alert. The conscious control of the mind is inhibited, and the subconscious mind awoken. Since the subconscious mind is a deeper-seated, more instinctive force than the conscious mind, this is the part which has to change for the client's behaviour and physical state to alter.

 

For example, a client who consciously wants to overcome their fear of spiders may try everything they consciously can to do it, but will still fail as long as their subconscious mind retains this terror and prevents the patient from succeeding. Progress can only be made be reprogramming the subconscious so that deep-seated instincts and beliefs are abolished or altered.

 

What form might the treatment take?

Firstly, any misconceptions a potential client may have about hypnosis should be dispelled. The technique does not involve the patient being put into a deep sleep, and the patient cannot be made to do anything they would not ordinarily do. They remain fully aware of their surroundings and situation, and are not vulnerable to every given command of the therapist. The important thing is that the client wants to change some behavioural habit or addiction and is highly motivated to do so. They have to want the treatment to work and must establish a good clinical rapport with the therapist in order for it to do so.

 

The readiness and ability of clients to be hypnotised varies considerably and hypnotherapy generally requires several sessions in order to achieve meaningful results. However the client can learn the technique of self-hypnosis which can be practiced at home, to reinforce the usefulness of formal sessions with the therapist. This can help counter distress and anxiety-related conditions.

 

What problems can be treated by hypnotherapy?

Hypnotherapy can be applied to many psychological, emotional and physical disorders.

 

The reason why hypnosis is more expensive that other therapies

Hypnotherapy sessions involve a lot more pre-session work, as already mentioned, with the client completing a questionnaire prior to the session and my writing a bespoke hypnotherapy script based on the information provided. For this reason I charge £95 per 1 hour session. My scripts also include an element of relaxation, so they can be used as bespoke guided meditations.  With this in mind I also provide, within that cost, a recording of the session to be played as often as you consider necessary. A bespoke recording, without attending a session, will be £45. A copy of a generic recording from my personal library appertaining to a particular issue can be purchased in MP3 format for £25.